Queen Street between King and Dorchester Street

Queen Street, c. 1860, Courtesy of the Public Archives and Records Office

Queen Street, c. 1860, Courtesy of the Public Archives and Records Office Acc3466-HF74.27.3.155

Like the block immediately south, this area was destroyed by the Great Fire of 1866. The building on the north east corner of Queen Street and King Street (52 Queen Street) was rebuilt just after the fire and became the American Variety Store.

Further up the street, Bremner Bros. Bookbinding and Printing could be found near the south east corner of Queen and Dorchester Streets. Among the publications of this well-known operation were Donald McDonald’s The Plan of Salvation (1874), Duncan Campbell’s History of Prince Edward Island (1875), and an edition of British historian Edith Thompson’s History of England (1878).

Bremner Bros. Advertisment

Bremner Bros. Advertisements

Later, businesses on the east side of  Queen Street included Bevan Bros. (now retail shops) and a building designed by architect, E.S. Blanchard for Dillon and Spillet, after a 1926 fire destroyed over half of the buildings here.

Across the street, on the south west corner of Queen and Dorchester Streets, a new building was erected for law firm Carr, Stevenson and MacKay in 2013.

The west side of Queen Street Courtesy of the Public Archives and Records Office

The west side of Queen Street, Courtesy of the Public Archives and Records Office, Acc3218-83

Next door, going south, the 1866 Victoria Building (Hyndman Building) became Charlottetown’s first four storey brick building. It came to be the home of W.R. Watson’s “City Drug Store” and Alexander MacKenzie’s confectionery business. Prior to F.W. Hyndman moving in, the building would serve as the headquarters for the Telephone Company of Prince Edward Island. F.W. Hyndman purchased the building in 1895 and renamed it the Hyndman Building. He had established his insurance business, St Lawrence Marine Underwriters, in 1872. It would later become Hyndman and Company Limited.

W.R. Watson's Interior, Courtesy of Meacham's 1880 Atlas

W.R. Watson’s Interior, Courtesy of Meacham’s 1880 Atlas

Further south, the building that houses the PEI Photo Lab was built after the 1866 fire. This corner was once referred to as “courthouse corner” for the private home that served as a courthouse prior to the construction of the first court on Queen Square in 1812. The building that stands here now was once a fox pelt consignment shop during the heyday of the silver fox boom. The large windows in the top floor were used to provide light to view the fox pelts. Happily they were retained during a renovation in the 1970s.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Share your stories with us!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s